Hurricane preparedness begins at the foundation

Hurricane Preparedness Begins At The Foundation

While the National Hurricane Center projects storms during the 2006 hurricane season will mirror the intensity of Hurricane Katrina, one of the deadliest hurricans in the history of the U.S., and one which caused more than $50 billion in damages to the Gulf Coast region, there are measures homeowners can take to better prepare their new-construction homes during the building phase.

Hurricane Preparedness Begins At The Foundation

While the National Hurricane Center projects storms during the 2006 hurricane season will mirror the intensity of Hurricane Katrina, one of the deadliest hurricanes in the history of the U.S., and one which caused more than $50 billion in damages to the Gulf Coast region, there are measures homeowners can take to better prepare their new-construction homes during the building phase.

The National Weather Service (NWS), the primary source of weather data, forecasts and warnings in the U.S., recommends homeowners verify that their homes meet current building code requirements for high winds, one of the many components associated with vicious Category 3+ hurricanes. The NWS says structures built to meet or exceed current building code high-wind provisions have a much better chance of surviving violent windstorms.

"Florida has some of the most stringent building codes in the U.S., led by Miami Dade County in South Florida," says Dr. Ronald Zollo, professor of civil and architectural engineering at

 


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