Getting fine art appraised

Getting fine art Appraised

Preparing for the Appraiser’s Exam

Locate all items in advance of the appraiser’s arrival and make them accessible.

Share pertinent records about when and where items were purchased, including their receipts. Receipts often have a paintings title, which may or may not appear on the back of the frame or on an attached plaque. Art works without a title may be determined if the artist is still living. Unfortunately, some artists do not remember titles or record them…

 

 

Preparing for the Appraiser’s Exam

Locate all items in advance of the appraiser’s arrival and make them accessible.

Share pertinent records about when and where items were purchased, including their receipts. Receipts often have a paintings title, which may or may not appear on the back of the frame or on an attached plaque. Art works without a title may be determined if the artist is still living. Unfortunately, some artists do not remember titles or record them in a permanent ledger. Not all art bears the date or dates it was completed. The date of the receipt could assist in dating the artwork. The goal is to create as complete a record about the artwork as possible. Don’t slow the process down or create an opportunity for the document to be less complete by holding back information.

Allocate enough time for the appraiser to carry out the inspection and the photography. Appraiser’s typically need about 15 minutes an item for both activities. While the appraiser often enjoys visiting with cli

 

Recommended For You